Date of Award

Summer 2016

Document Type

Dissertation

Degree Name

Doctor of Psychology (PsyD)

Department

Department of Graduate Psychology

Advisor(s)

Trevor F. Stokes

Elena Savina

Anne Stewart

Abstract

Parent-Child Interaction Therapy (PCIT) is a well-established, empirically-supported treatment for young children with disruptive behaviors. PCIT was initially designed for treatment of typically-developing children with oppositional and disruptive behaviors. There is emerging support for PCIT as a treatment for behavior challenges seen in children with developmental delays. However, some modifications may be needed to respond to the severity of delay, parent treatment goals, and the function of the challenging behavior. Using a non-concurrent multiple-baseline experimental design, the current study examined the effectiveness of a modified PCIT approach for a preschool child with global developmental delay and co-occurring behavior problems. Modifications were informed by empirically-supported procedures from applied behavior analysis (ABA). Meaningful, observable changes were shown in parent behaviors across home and clinic settings. Positive changes in the child’s cooperative play with the parent and a slightly older sibling were observed in generalization probes. A reduction in parent perception of problem behavior frequency and parent- and sibling-reported satisfaction with the treatment goals, procedures, and outcomes supported clinically meaningful outcomes.

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