Date of Award

Fall 2009

Document Type

Dissertation

Degree Name

Doctor of Philosophy (PhD)

Department

Department of Graduate Psychology

Advisor(s)

Donna L. Sundre

Abstract

Recently more universities have started administering course evaluations online. With the process no longer in the classroom, some students decide not to complete their course evaluations during their own time, resulting in concerns about online course evaluation results being biased because of lack of response. This study examined course evaluation results at a small diverse mid-Atlantic Catholic university. A cross-classified random effects model was used to capture student responses across all of their courses. Nonresponse bias was examined by determining predictors of online course evaluation ratings and participation. Variables predicting both participation and ratings were considered to be a potential source of nonresponse bias. It was found that gender, ethnicity, and final course grade predicted online course evaluation participation. Only final course grade predicted online course evaluation ratings.

Included in

Psychology Commons

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