Senior Honors Projects, 2010-current

Preferred Name - First Author

Olivia Kimmel

Date of Award

Spring 2017

Document Type

Thesis

Degree Name

Bachelor of Arts (BA)

Department

Department of Kinesiology

Advisor(s)

Dr. Greg Young

Abstract

The present study sought to expand on past research by examining the relationship between coaching behaviors (i.e., controlling coaching and autonomy-supportive coaching) and athletic injury. One hundred Division I athletes were given a battery of questionnaires, in the form of a single Qualtrics survey to assess the relationship between coaching behaviors and athletic injury. Controlling coaching was found to be positively correlated to the presence of pain and certain perceived causes of injury, as well as negatively correlated to athletes discussing their injury with their coach and the coach being an influence in athletes’ decision to return to their sport. Autonomy-supportive coaching was shown to be positively correlated to athletes discussing their injury with their coach and one’s coach being an influence in their return to their sport. As such, this study supported past research in showing that autonomy-supportive coaching is related to more adaptive outcomes than controlling coaching behaviors. Therefore, it is recommended that coaches use autonomy-supportive coaching in order to enhance the psychological, as well as physical well-being of their athletes.

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