Senior Honors Projects, 2010-current

Date of Award

Spring 2014

Document Type

Thesis

Degree Name

Bachelor of Science (BS)

Department

Department of Sociology and Anthropology

Advisor(s)

Kerry Dobransky

Stephen Poulson

Kimiko Tanaka

Abstract

In recent years, formal mentorship programs for at-risk youth have grown increasingly in the United States. I investigate the ways in which mentoring models in these programs do or do not address the need to transmit social capital and cultural capital to the youth that they serve. Through observations of mentor- mentee matches, semistructured interviews of mentors and organizational staff, and data collection at two nonprofit organizations with formal mentoring components, this paper explores the ways in which these programs unknowingly set goals to transfer social and cultural capital to their mentees, and how mentors attain these goals.

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