Event Title

Microwatt CMOS Harvesters

Start Date

17-6-2015 11:15 AM

End Date

17-6-2015 12:00 PM

Description

Wireless microsensors can not only monitor and manage power consumption in small- and large-scale applications for space, military, medical, agricultural, and consumer markets but also add energy-saving and life-saving intelligence to large infrastructures and tiny contraptions in remote and difficult-to-reach places. Ultra-small systems, however, cannot store sufficient energy to sustain monitoring, interface, processing, and telemetry functions for extended periods. And replacing or recharging the batteries of hundreds of networked nodes is prohibitive, and often impossible. This is why ambient sources are the subject of ardent research today. Except, power densities are low, and in some cases, intermittent, so these devices cannot power many functions. Plus, tiny lithium-ion batteries and super capacitors, while power dense, cannot sustain life for long. This talk illustrates how tiny fuel cells, batteries, and energy-harvesting generators can power practical microsystems for extended periods. For this, the presentation reviews prevailing system requirements, notes technological constraints, and shows the state of the art in miniaturized energy sources and microwatt CMOS harvesters.

Please note: The presentation given at this workshop is not available, However, Dr. Rincón-Mora provided a related paper for the workshop website. This paper may be accessed below under "Additional Files."

estpe14_ll_sync.pdf (1384 kB)
Related Paper

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Jun 17th, 11:15 AM Jun 17th, 12:00 PM

Microwatt CMOS Harvesters

Wireless microsensors can not only monitor and manage power consumption in small- and large-scale applications for space, military, medical, agricultural, and consumer markets but also add energy-saving and life-saving intelligence to large infrastructures and tiny contraptions in remote and difficult-to-reach places. Ultra-small systems, however, cannot store sufficient energy to sustain monitoring, interface, processing, and telemetry functions for extended periods. And replacing or recharging the batteries of hundreds of networked nodes is prohibitive, and often impossible. This is why ambient sources are the subject of ardent research today. Except, power densities are low, and in some cases, intermittent, so these devices cannot power many functions. Plus, tiny lithium-ion batteries and super capacitors, while power dense, cannot sustain life for long. This talk illustrates how tiny fuel cells, batteries, and energy-harvesting generators can power practical microsystems for extended periods. For this, the presentation reviews prevailing system requirements, notes technological constraints, and shows the state of the art in miniaturized energy sources and microwatt CMOS harvesters.

Please note: The presentation given at this workshop is not available, However, Dr. Rincón-Mora provided a related paper for the workshop website. This paper may be accessed below under "Additional Files."