Creative Commons License

Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 4.0 License.

Date of Award

Spring 2014

Document Type


Degree Name

Master of Arts (MA)


Department of Graduate Psychology


There are two categories of preference assessments, indirect (e.g., student and teacher surveys) and direct (e.g., multiple stimulus, multiple stimulus without replacement, paired stimulus and single stimulus) preference assessments. Although indirect assessments are less time consuming, direct assessment methods are better predictors of both preference and reinforcing value. While there is a growing body of research demonstrating the advantages of direct preference assessments, little has been done to incorporate technology efficiently into the preference assessment process. The present study proposed the use of PowerPoint© as a way of use efficiently use technology in the preference assessment process. To validate the use of Microsoft PowerPoint©, the study compared the outcomes of the preference assessment using Microsoft PowerPoint© to a tangible preference assessment. Finally, participants completed a picture-to-object discrimination task as a way of demonstrating that participants had the skills required to complete a picture preference assessment. There was high agreement between the tangible and the PowerPoint© preference assessments; especially for higher and lower ranked items. Both participants also did well on the discrimination task demonstrating they had the skills needed to accurately complete the picture preference assessment. Results are discussed in terms of directions for future research as well as ways to incorporate the use of Microsoft PowerPoint© into daily preference assessments.

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Psychology Commons