Creative Commons License

Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 4.0 License.

Date of Award

Spring 2017

Document Type

Thesis

Degree Name

Master of Science (MS)

Department

Department of Health Sciences

Advisor(s)

Jeremy Akers

Danielle M. Torisky

Elizabeth Skidmore Edwards

Abstract

Purpose: The purpose of this study was to determine if collegiate and recreational basketball players shooting accuracy improved after consumption of breakfast (BF) compared to no-breakfast (No-BF).

Methods: 24 male and female collegiate and recreational basketball players completed a three-week intervention study with a crossover design. Subjects were randomly assigned to a four-day BF or No-BF treatment starting on Monday and completed testing that included a free-throw drill and timed 2-point and 3-point drills on day four. Treatment switched the following Monday. Food intake records were collected during each treatment phase.

Results: There was no difference between BF and No-BF treatments in amount of shots taken and percentage of shots made during free-throw, 2-point and 3-point drills. In addition, no difference was observed between BF and No-BF treatment when the number of shots taken during 2-point and 3-point drill was combined. There was a significant difference observed between BF and No-BF in mean percentage of shots made during the free throw, 2-point and 3-point drill combined, (BF= 59.2±6.8, No-BF= 48.3±5.4, p-value < 0.001).

Conclusion: Despite the finding that mean shooting percentage was improved when the free-throw, 2-point and 3-point drill were combined, the main finding of the study was that breakfast consumption did not show significant improvement in basketball shooting accuracy when free throw, 2-point and 3-point basketball shooting drills were observed separately.

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