Presentation Title

JMU Student. ROTC Cadet : A qualitative analysis of dual identity when seeking student support services.

Presenter Information

Tonya SchoenbeckFollow

Faculty Advisor Name

Lindsey Harvell-Bowman

Department

School of Communication Studies

Description

This qualitative analysis is a review of the level of awareness of three programs offered by James Madison University’s Student Success Center (SSC) and perceptions of using those services by the ROTC Cadets. This analysis consists of a literature review and data from four focus groups. By discussing three key student services, I sought to obtain information on possible barriers to this group accessing services, attitudes surrounding these services and the impact of interpersonal communication on a group that not only has intersectionality, but also a dual identity, as well as a competitive environment between each other.

Intersectionality is different than the dual identity presented. Dual identity occurs when group members can conceive two distinctive groups (white and black) within a superordinate (American) social identity.

It is suggested that the military culture of ROTC creates a distinctive group in which military and civilian lie within the superordinate social identity of a JMU student. Atuel and Castro stated in their research, that it is estimated that seven percent of the United States population has served in the military, creating a cultural gap between those that have served in the military with those that have not.

Although the ROTC Cadets at JMU are not necessarily sworn United States Service Members, they do have parallel elements to the military, which creates a unique culture aside from their civilian counterparts. A dual identity classification does not take away from other identities within the student and ROTC roles such as race, gender and religion, rather it identifies another culture or intersectionality for the Cadets to better understand their perceptions during their time in the higher education setting.

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JMU Student. ROTC Cadet : A qualitative analysis of dual identity when seeking student support services.

This qualitative analysis is a review of the level of awareness of three programs offered by James Madison University’s Student Success Center (SSC) and perceptions of using those services by the ROTC Cadets. This analysis consists of a literature review and data from four focus groups. By discussing three key student services, I sought to obtain information on possible barriers to this group accessing services, attitudes surrounding these services and the impact of interpersonal communication on a group that not only has intersectionality, but also a dual identity, as well as a competitive environment between each other.

Intersectionality is different than the dual identity presented. Dual identity occurs when group members can conceive two distinctive groups (white and black) within a superordinate (American) social identity.

It is suggested that the military culture of ROTC creates a distinctive group in which military and civilian lie within the superordinate social identity of a JMU student. Atuel and Castro stated in their research, that it is estimated that seven percent of the United States population has served in the military, creating a cultural gap between those that have served in the military with those that have not.

Although the ROTC Cadets at JMU are not necessarily sworn United States Service Members, they do have parallel elements to the military, which creates a unique culture aside from their civilian counterparts. A dual identity classification does not take away from other identities within the student and ROTC roles such as race, gender and religion, rather it identifies another culture or intersectionality for the Cadets to better understand their perceptions during their time in the higher education setting.