Preferred Name

Samiullah Nuristani

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 4.0 License.

Date of Graduation

9-21-1980

Document Type

Dissertation

Degree Name

Doctor of Philosophy (PhD)

Department

School of Strategic Leadership Studies

Advisor(s)

Professor Margaret Sloan, Ph.D

Karen A. Ford, DSW

Suzanne Fiederlein, Ph.D

Abstract

Afghanistan remains fragmented and disintegrated along ethnic and linguistic lines. This fragmentation has prevented the Afghan people from achieving its most important and immediate goal: nationhood. This failed quest for nationhood renders progress in other areas insignificant and irrelevant. Corruption is a major culprit that has contributed to disintegration and remains as a major impediment to the struggle of the Afghan people to achieve nationhood. Corruption corrodes some of the most valued features of a society. For instance, corruption is reported to undermine trust among people, erode trust in public institutions and the leaders who lead them, and impede political and civic participation. In the literature, these features combined are referred to as social capital.

Recognizing the widespread nature of corruption in Afghanistan and that Afghanistan continues to fail in its pursuit of nationhood, this study sets out to explore the potential impacts of corruption on social capital. This study employs a convergent mixed methods design to explore empirically the corrosive effects of government corruption on social capital. Exploring the nature of this link as well as the extent of the link might help leaders devise specific and actionable strategies to tackle corruption. Doing so could also aid the people of Afghanistan achieve the ever elusive goal: nationhood.

Available for download on Sunday, December 18, 2022

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