Creative Commons License

Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 4.0 License.

Date of Award

Fall 2010

Document Type


Degree Name

Master of Science (MS)


Department of Integrated Science and Technology


Robert Ghirlando


As construction and building development increases in the local scene, and the threat of climate change escalates, addressing green buildings on the national agenda is of vital importance. The building sector has a significant potential to implement positive change and hence become more efficient in terms of resource use. The term ‘green’ has been widely used throughout the last few decades to denote environmentally friendly policies, principles and measures. The ever growing popularity of the term was brought about by increasing concerns and issues such as those pertaining to climate change, energy crisis and resource depletion. Central to this debate are buildings, land use and development. Buildings have been identified as a major contributor and driver of climate change. In Malta, the ‘green debate’ emerged in the early nineties with its importance increasing year after year on the national agenda. This was further stimulated through Malta’s accession to the European Union; a process which saw local premature environmental legislation becoming coherent to EU futuristic policies. This thesis examines green building concepts, principles and practices within the Maltese context. This thesis explores the concept of a green building and the elements associated with its design and construction as well as the characteristics and influence of the various building rating systems.