Creative Commons License

Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 4.0 License.

Date of Graduation

Spring 2019

Document Type

Thesis

Degree Name

Master of Science (MS)

Department

School of Hospitality, Sport and Recreation Management

Advisor(s)

Julia Wallace Carr

Joshua R. Pate

Benjamin H. Carr

Abstract

Few studies have explored the experiences of women in collegiate athletics administration. The underrepresentation of women in administration positions continues to raise concern with a growing need to understand the career progression and experiences of women. The purpose of this study was to explore perceived barriers inhibiting and facilitators shaping the career progression of women in collegiate athletics administration. Participants identified for the study were located in the Mid-Atlantic region of the United States and currently employed by Division I institutions.

The type of qualitative research conducted in this study was a descriptive case study. Data were collected through standard open-ended interviews and resumes or career history describing positions held, duration, and the location of each. An interview guide was established with considerations to a previous study conducted by Hancock (2012), career construction theory and two pilot interviews. Data was collected from 9 women collegiate athletics administrators.

Findings of this study included perceived barriers identified as work-life balance and a male-dominated industry. Perceived facilitators included mentors, supervisors, and support systems. Findings also indicate continuing challenges both personally and professionally. Yet, nearly half of the participants (4) identified as the anomaly or exception to the norm. Study findings provided valued information for current collegiate athletics administrators and future entry-level professionals of the industry.

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