Preferred Name

Venus Miller

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 4.0 License.

ORCID

https://orcid.org/0000-0002-8300-2620

Date of Graduation

Spring 2019

Document Type

Thesis

Degree Name

Master of Science in Education (MSEd)

Department

Department of Learning, Technology and Leadership Education

Advisor(s)

Noorjehan Brantmeier

Abstract

As universities and colleges around the world strive to provide rigorous academic instruction, they are also preparing their students to enter into the world of work. According to research conducted by American College Test (ACT), Americans value education because they believe it will provide economic benefit to those that participate in the system. By the year 2018, the majority of newly created jobs in the United States of America (U.S.) are likely to require a college degree (Matter, Burrus, Camara, O’Connor, Hansen, Gambrell, Casillas, & Bobek, 2014). This fact suggests that in order for students to be prepared to enter the world of work they must possess the competencies and skills needed to be successful. This study explores student’s perceptions of their career readiness development in relation to their engagement with career resources and programming. A mixed methods approach was used to assess undergraduate seniors at a four-year public institution. This study provides insight regarding which of the eight competencies as defined by the National Association of Colleges and Employers (NACE) students feel they have the most development in preparation for their future career paths. The findings reveled that students that utilized career services during their senior year felt more confident in their career readiness skill development. This survey has important implications for career offices that want to assess programming and services to develop a competency-based framework.

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