Preferred Name

Allison Brandmark

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 4.0 License.

ORCID

https://orcid.org/0000-0002-4806-7103

Date of Graduation

Spring 2019

Document Type

Thesis

Degree Name

Master of Arts (MA)

Department

Department of Graduate Psychology

Advisor(s)

Krisztina Jakobsen

Trevor Stokes

Daniel D. Holt

Abstract

Joint Attention (JA) is a social interaction in which attention is concurrently managed between an object or event and a social partner. One social partner initiates joint attention (IJA) by directing the attention of the other social partner. In return, the other social partner responds to joint attention (RJA) by following the social cues. A deficit in JA, which is commonly seen in children with Autism Spectrum Disorder, is correlated with delayed language development and lower levels of communication and social skills. Several studies have successfully trained both IJA and RJA using in-person methodologies. With the development of new technology, researchers have started using eye-tracking devices for a more precise measurement of JA. This has led to innovative training paradigms. This study used an eye-tracking device and pre-recorded videos to teach a preschool-aged child with a developmental delay to engage in RJA. While it did not generalize to IJA or in-person measures, there was a slight increase in RJA. With further refinement, this presents a potential alternative way to teach JA.

Share

COinS