Senior Honors Projects, 2020-current

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

Date of Graduation

5-8-2020

Document Type

Thesis

Degree Name

Bachelor of Science (BS)

Department

Department of Physics and Astronomy

Advisor(s)

Klebert Feitosa

Marcelo Dias

Abstract

The ability to manipulate surface elastic instabilities finds many applications in engineering smart interfaces, e.g. in fluid-structure interaction and micro-fabrication. We study the buckling of a thin cylindrical shell constrained to slide onto an inner non-deformable pipe. Our goal is to characterize the relationship between the shell thickness and the localization of stresses by using curvature measurements. First, we induce surface buckling by immobilizing one end of the shell and applying force to the other end. Then, we obtain a virtual reconstruction of the surface from 3D optical scanning and compute the Gaussian curvature for every point on the mesh. We find that as the shell gets thinner, the distribution of Gaussian curvatures becomes broader. Furthermore, measurements of areas enclosed by the parabolic lines around protruding vertices from the buckled surface show that the transitions between regions of positive and negative curvature are more localized. Finally, the Gaussian curvature reveals the formation of substructures within the lobes around the vertices. The localization results demonstrate that the cylindrical shell clearly evolves towards the isometric limit represented by the well-known Yoshimura pattern. However, the emergence of substructures indicates that this evolution is more complex than originally anticipated.

Share

COinS
 
 

To view the content in your browser, please download Adobe Reader or, alternately,
you may Download the file to your hard drive.

NOTE: The latest versions of Adobe Reader do not support viewing PDF files within Firefox on Mac OS and if you are using a modern (Intel) Mac, there is no official plugin for viewing PDF files within the browser window.